Landlords Lose Remedies Or Do They? – The Lockbox

 

Most commercial landlords are familiar with the concept (or actually use) a bank “lockbox” for deposits of rent and other lease charges from tenants. The process is simple. Take for example a shopping center development. Instead of the landlord receiving checks by mail or other carrier, tenants deliver their payments directly (usually via via ACH) to a bank that holds all of the payments in a single account.

The advantages of this system are numerous:

  1. Landlords don’t have to spend the time or the $$ to collect and account for all of the monthly or periodic payments owed by the tenants;
  2. Although there is generally a fee charged by the bank for this service, it is usually far outweighed by the cost of employees or third party collectors doing the same job; and
  3. The bank provides a clear timely report of which tenants are making payments, short paying, or not paying at all.

So, assuming you are a landlord with multiple properties and/or numerous tenants, why would you not choose this method of gathering and accounting for rents, TICAM  and other payments?  Unfortunately in many states if a rent payment is deposited, it is considered to be accepted by the owner and constitutes a waiver of all defaults. In addition, most banks will not block individual tenant’s payments, short of closing the account entirely. Not a good solution for the landlord, especially when the anchor tenants are paying through the lockbox as well.

So what do you do if you don’t want to block your lockbox?

In many situations landlords and their attorneys have attempted to come up with creative solutions to this problem, including:

1. Attempting to reverse the payment through the bank;

2. Sending the tenant a replacement check in the same amount with a letter reiterating the default is not waived and landlord maintains its position that it can act on its remedies;

3. Changing the notice address for payments to a P.O. Box or even better, someone’s office; or

4. Reporting to the bank that any payments received by the defaulting tenant are potentially fraudulent.

Which of these have been successful?  Under the first scenario, most tenants have successfully argued that once the check is negotiated by virtue of deposit into the lockbox account, the receipt of the same and waiver cannot be undone.

In the second situation, tenants have either refused to accept the payment back from the landlord either by ignoring certified mail or hiding from the FedEx person!  Thus, the tenant can frustrate the attempt to avoid a waiver.

In the last scenario, even when there has been a history of bad checks issued by a tenant, most banks will not investigate checks sent by the offending tenant before they go directly into the lockbox deposit. This is also dangerous, as a savvy tenant could argue that the landlord is setting them up to default by creating a mechanism by which they can evict or collect additional monies per the remedies section of the lease.

For tenants who are concerned about getting their rent in on time and in full, the third situation may work. However, a canny tenant would continue to send the rent to the lockbox. Although that may be technically a default of the notice paragraph in the lease, courts have held that it does not undo the waiver of the default by the owner.

Is this the end of the story?

Maybe not.

Some courts have ruled that waiver must be a conscious choice regarding legal rights as to the tenant. In other words, the landlord must have actual knowledge that the payment is being made and intentionally not take action to allow the check to be accepted.  In the case of Manufacturing Co. v. Building Co., 97 S.E. 718, the North Carolina Supreme Court stated that “[w]aiver must be manifested in some unequivocal way, and to operate as such, it must in all cases be designed, must have so acted as to induce the other to believe that he intended to waive…”.  The case also cited Justice Holmes’ classic definition of the doctrine of “election” from Bierce v. Hutchins, 205 U.S.340, that “[e]lection is simply what its name imports; a choice shown by an overt act , between two inconsistent rights, either which may be asserted at the will of the chooser alone.”

In the lockbox situation, an affirmative election to not waive the tenant’s default (by returning the payment and stating in writing such election and intent not to waive the default), the landlord would arguably be able to maintain an action for eviction, collection and other damages despite the tenant’s position to the contrary.

Business Decision or Rely on the Courts?

One final point.  Aside from the legal outcome of accepting lockbox payments, landlords may want to consider shutting a lockbox account down temporarily in order to have rock solid grounds to oust a tenant. Consider the situation of a large tenant in a industrial park who has defaulted repeatedly and the presence of a more solid and attractive replacement tenant for the same space. Foregoing the rent payments for a month or two may make more long term business sense than accepting the rent from the defaulting tenant and potentially losing the replacement business in the process. Obviously this is not an easy decision to make in most cases and lender restrictions and other factors could easily complicate the decision.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s